Avro (Canada) Lancaster

An Avro Lancaster B.III being readied in wartime.

Overview

Overview

The Avro Lancaster was derived from the unsuccessful twin-engine Avro Manchester bomber that first flew in 1939.  The decision was made in late 1940 to replace the two Rolls Royce Vulture engines of the Manchester with four of the more reliable Rolls Royce Merlin (in Canada, Packard Merlin) engines, which had a proven record in the Hurricane and Spitfire fighter designs. The revised design was an immediate success and the Lancaster went on to carry the heaviest individual bomb loads of the Second World War. The Lancaster was manufactured in Canada by Victory Aircraft Ltd. in Malton, Ontario, and 430 Mk 10 versions were built. In post-war use, the Canadian- built Lancasters went on to serve in highly useful roles.  Quickly converted into photographic reconnaissance variants for charting and mapping and into maritime patrol versions, the Lancaster soldiered on well into the Cold War era.

 

Avro Lancaster's general characteristics
CharacteristicDetail
Model No: 683
Marks B.I, B.II, B.III,B.X,XPP, Mk 10 AP,AR,BR,DC, Mk 10 MP,MR,N, Mk 10 P,PR,S,SR
Role Bomber  / Photographic Reconnaissance / Maritime Patrol
Taken on strength 1944
Struck off strength 1965
Number 229
Service RCAF   

 

Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications

 

Specifications (Mk X aircraft)
CharacteristicDetail
Manufacturer Victory Aircraft Ltd., which became A.V. Roe (Avro) Canada
Crew / Passengers One pilot and up to 6 crew
Powerplant Four 1,620 horsepower Packard Merlin 224 piston engines
Maximum speed 272 miles per hour (438 kilometres per hour) 
Cruising Speed 200 miles per hour (322 kilometres per hour)
Service Ceiling 24,700 feet (7,528 metres) 
Range 2,530 miles (4,072 kilometres)
Empty weight 35,240 pounds (15,999 kilograms)
Gross weight 60,000 pounds (27,400 kilograms)
Span 102 feet (31.09 metres)    
Length 69 feet 6 inches (21.18 metres)
Height 20 feet (6.10 metres)           
Wing area 1,297 square feet (120.49 square metres)
Armament Provision for three gun turrets each with two or four .303 calibre machine guns, up to 14,000 pound (6,350 kilogram) bomb load
Original cost Unknown

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

 

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