Cessna Crane

Cessna Crane

DND

The diminutive Cessna Crane in the RCAF’s predominately all-yellow British Commonwealth Air Training Plan colours.

Overview

Overview

The Cessna T-50 Crane, or Bobcat as it was known in American service, was a light twin-engine trainer procured in large numbers by both the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) and the United States military during the Second World War. The aircraft was conventional for the period, featuring a low cantilever wing. The aircraft featured a mixed-material construction with the wings and tail made of wood and the fuselage made of welded steel tube. The skin featured a combination of lightweight wood and fabric. The retractable tail wheel and trailing edge flaps were electrically equipped. The type supplemented the Avro Anson in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan service. The Crane provided valuable multi-engine training throughout the Second World War. The vast majority of the Cranes were retired at the end of the war, but a few lingered on in light communication duties.

Model number T-50
Marks Mk I, IA
Role Trainer
Taken on strength 1941
Struck off strength 1949
Number 826
Service RCAF

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

Technical specifications

Technical specifications

 

Manufacturer Cessna Aircraft Corporation
Crew / passengers Two pilots with provisions for three passengers
Powerplant Two 245 hp Jacobs R-755-9 radial engines
Maximum speed 195 mph (314 km/h)
Cruising speed 175 mph (282 km/h)
Service ceiling 22,000 ft (6,705 m)
Range 750 mi (1,207 km)
Empty weight 3,500 lb (1,588 kg)
Gross weight  5,700 lb (2,585 kg)
Span 41 ft 11 in (12.78 m)
Length 32 ft 9 in (9.98 m)
Height 9 ft 11 in (3.02 m)
Wing area 295 sq ft (27.41 m2)
Armament None
Cost Unknown

Source: Canadian Combat and Support Aircraft: A Military Compendium by T.F.J. Leversedge © 2007. Translated and reproduced with permission of the author.

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